HM Insights

Legal Insights & Industry Updates

Life, business and the law

The law never stands still, and the way it applies to you and your organisation is constantly evolving. Our people are on top of these developments and can keep you up to date with some of the most interesting aspects of these changes. Check out our articles and updates for our perspective on issues that might affect you.

Latest Articles

  • HMRC to gain new civil powers to obtain financial information without permission

    HMRC to gain new civil powers to obtain financial information without permission

    A new measure that will provide HMRC with additional civil information powers is expected to take effect when the Finance Bill 2020-21 receives Royal Assent. The new measure known as a Financial Institution Notice (FIN) will be used to require financial institutions to provide information to HMRC, when requested, about a specific taxpayer and without the need for approval from either the taxpayer or the independent tribunal that considers tax matters. These provisions will take the form of an amendment to HMRC current powers under schedule 36 of the Finance Act 2008.

  • Personal Injury Trusts – National Road Victim Month

    Personal Injury Trusts – National Road Victim Month

    August marks National Road Victim Month – an opportunity to remember people who have been killed or injured on our roads and strive to make our roads safer. Britain's first road death occurred in August 1896, when Bridget Driscoll was killed in Crystal Palace and following the death of Diana Princess of Wales on 31 August 1997, charitable organisation RoadPeace designated August National Road Victim Month.

  • Trust Registration Service – Further Changes

    Trust Registration Service – Further Changes

    Taking on the role of an Executor carries with it a great deal of responsibility. An Executor has the legal authority to administer an estate and is ultimately responsible for any mistakes made. They can be held personally financially liable for any breaches of duty. As a result it is imperative that the Executor does everything in his power to ensure that they include all assets in the inventory of the estate and that they settle all liabilities of the Estate in full.

  • What happens if your Will is unclear?

    What happens if your Will is unclear?

    In Scotland, generally Wills are to be interpreted intrinsically – or within the four corners of the document. The question is what the document actually says, which may well be different from what any potential beneficiaries would like it to say.  Any extrinsic evidence will not, as a general rule, be permitted when it comes to determining the intention of the testator.