HM Insights

Legal Insights & Industry Updates

Life, business and the law

The law never stands still, and the way it applies to you and your organisation is constantly evolving. Our people are on top of these developments and can keep you up to date with some of the most interesting aspects of these changes. Check out our articles and updates for our perspective on issues that might affect you.

Latest Commercial property articles

  • How do you get permission to use outdoor areas as Temporary Premises for the sale of alcohol?

    How do you get permission to use outdoor areas as Temporary Premises for the sale of alcohol?

    Many restaurant and licensed trade operators will be looking at car parks, service yards and other outdoor areas with a view to using these for impromptu outdoor restaurants, cafes or pop up bars as the hospitality industry in Scotland gears up for the provisional re-opening date of 15 July. While there will be an understandable rush to get venues ready for any change in the lockdown, and the authorities are showing a willingness to be flexible, there are still potential pitfalls with serious repercussions for operators.

  • Reform of Secured Transactions in Scotland: Implications for Renewable Energy Projects

    Reform of Secured Transactions in Scotland: Implications for Renewable Energy Projects

    In March 2020, the UK government signalled a shift in energy policy by announcing its intention to bring onshore wind and solar development back into the Contracts for Difference (CfD) subsidy regime. It is no surprise then that investors are attracted by the bondlike nature of these subsidised projects. The 2020s will likely see increased confidence among funders, with a resulting boost to renewable energy projects in Scotland. However, funders should be aware that there is a discrete property and security law regime in Scotland that affects what security can be obtained by Lenders. It is important that developers and funders seek expert legal advice on the quirks of the Scottish system.

  • Coronavirus: ensure unoccupied commercial property remains insured

    Coronavirus: ensure unoccupied commercial property remains insured

    Generally speaking, many UK insurers define a commercial property as being "unoccupied" if it is empty or not being fully utilised for business purposes for a continuous period of 30 days. Some insurers have extended the period to 60 days due to the current lockdown, but owners of such properties should carefully check their policies and contact their providers to be sure that they remain covered.