HM Insights

Life, business and the law

The law never stands still, and the way it applies to you and your organisation is constantly evolving. Our people are on top of these developments and can keep you up to date with some of the most interestings aspects of these changes. Check out our articles and updates for our perspective on issues that might affect you.

Latest articles from Lynsey Brown

  • Surrogacy in Scotland – what you need to know in terms of the law

    Surrogacy in Scotland – what you need to know in terms of the law

    Surrogacy is a hot topic again, with the news that Robbie Williams and Ayda Fields – the married couple who are also X-Factor judges - have welcomed a third child who was born via a surrogate mother. There are many reasons why a couple may choose to go down the surrogacy route when starting or expanding their family, and there are just as many legal considerations to take into account when deciding whether this path is for them.

  • Just how binding are Separation Agreements in law?

    Just how binding are Separation Agreements in law?

    When married couples separate, there are often financial and childcare issues to be resolved. In the usual course of events, these matters are resolved via negotiations with a view to entering into a Separation Agreement, also known as a Minute of Agreement. But are these Agreements watertight, or can they be challenged?

  • Is there a case to be made for adult adoption in Scotland?

    Is there a case to be made for adult adoption in Scotland?

    The spotlight has been on step-parent adoptions in recent weeks, with Nathan Sparling, aged 27, launching a campaign to have the law in Scotland changed to allow adults to be adopted. The current age limit for someone to be adopted in Scotland is 18. Here we look at adoption in Scotland and what any change to the law might mean.

  • Contact with children after separation – what are your rights?

    Contact with children after separation – what are your rights?

    When parents separate and there are children of the relationship to consider, separated parents can have different views on what is best for the children going forward. In some cases, an impasse is reached and parents are unable to agree on matters such as when the non-resident parent will have contact. In these cases, parties will often consult solicitors to negotiate child contact arrangements on their behalf, attend mediation, or, in a minority of cases the court will require to adjudicate.